Why personal injury attorneys and car accident lawyers may refuse your case – Statute of Limitations

Why car accident lawyers and personal injury attorneys may refuse your case – Indiana Statute of Limitations

Personal injury lawyers and the Indiana statute of limitations

Every so often, I receive a call from someone who has been unsuccessful in securing legal representation for their personal injury claim. There are as many reasons why an injury lawyer will turn down a claim, as there are facts and circumstances surrounding the claim. In part 1 of this series, I’ll explain why attorneys may turn down a case nearing the statute of limitations.

Consultation – The Groundwork – Personal Injury Attorney and Car Accident Lawyers

Before a personal injury lawyer agrees to represent a claimant, both parties will meet face-to-face to discuss the potential claim. The attorney will want to study the police report and accompanying eyewitness testimony, review medical records and provider billings incurred to date and examine any other evidence available at this early stage of the process. If liability or collectability is in question, a deeper investigation may be necessary. When an attorney believes a claim has value and has faith in the honesty and integrity of the claimant, they will enter into a contingency agreement whereby the attorney agrees to advance the firm’s monetary and staff resources to pursue the “win” for their client. It is costly to litigate a case. Expenditures made on behalf of the client and their claim may include but are not limited to investigation, research, document preparation, court costs, exhibits, reports, expert witness fees, court reporters, professional fees and costs of mediation.

The Statute of Limitations – Personal Injury Cases

The statute of limitations is a time limit imposed upon a claimant or representative of a deceased person to notice defendants and file a claim with the court against the person(s), entity or entities responsible for their damages. Indiana has a 2-year statute of limitations to file a personal injury claim against parties responsible for their economic, non-economic   and punitive damages. In claims involving a governmental entity, the claimant must file a Notice of Tort Claim within 180 days of the accident. These deadlines begin to run from the date the claimant received the injuries or the claimant’s date of death. Exceptions may be found at IC 34-11-2-4. It is unfortunate when people wait to pursue their claim against the wrongdoer until days or even weeks before the statute of limitations has run. It takes time to review a claim and to mount an effective case. Many lawyers are reluctant to commit their professional time, services and financial resources to a claim filed in haste.

Experienced Car Accident Lawyers | Personal Injury Attorneys

If you or someone you know has been involved in an accident, our firm recommends you consult with an attorney experienced in personal injury matters as soon as possible. The attorneys at Ward & Ward Law Firm have more than 85 combined years of experience practicing personal injury, wrongful death and medical malpractice law. Call Charlie Ward today at 317-639-9501 for a free consultation.

Charlie Ward
Ward & Ward Law Firm, Car Accident Lawyers
728 S Meridian St
Indianapolis, IN 46228
cpw@wardlawfirm.com
Phone: 317-639-9501