Insurance Companies Hire Attorney Advocates—Shouldn’t You?

Who represents your interests?

At Ward & Ward, we often meet honest people who’ve been injured in accidents, through no fault of their own, opt to work on their own behalf and in good faith with
their auto insurance carrier to resolve the disputes that naturally arise from an accident. But all too quickly these same sincere folk realize that they have become entangled in a web of self-interested parties including their own healthcare insurer, individual providers who have delivered costly medical services, the negligent party’s insurance company as well as their own automobile insurance company—and each party is looking after
their own competing interests
.

With over eighty-five years of combined experience in personal injury and wrongful death cases, Don and Charlie Ward understand how the well-being of these same people can easily get trampled on the battleground of competing parties attempting to recover costs and minimize losses. Don and Charlie know that insurance companies hire their own attorneys to represent their
‘bottom line’ best interests which may—indirectly—put your welfare secondary to their own.

Indiana has a two-year statute of limitations on personal
injury and wrongful death claims resulting from an auto, motorcycle or trucking
(semi tractor-trailer) accident. Most claims can be amicably settled before the
statute runs. But occasionally extenuating circumstances may require a
long and expensive investigative process before a lawsuit can be filed with the Court. Keeping
in mind that the two-year clock starts running on the date of your accident or
injury, we recommend that you speak with an experienced personal injury attorney
as soon as possible to receive an honest evaluation of your case.

Should we represent you, you will enjoy the full
financial resources of the firm. That means there are no up-front costs to you!
And when you hire the law firm of Ward & Ward, we’ll work on your behalf to make
things right. The insurance companies have lawyers—shouldn’t you enjoy the same
strategic advantage?